One A Day For A Year–Here’s Number 365

Quotes and Notes #365, November 4

“Knowing when to stop is the number one sign of a good writer.”—Jane B. Schulz, “My Mother Taught Me To Write”

Everything is going to be all right, diagram by Carmen Butcher

Everything is going to be all right, diagram by Carmen Butcher

One time my grandmother came home from church and I asked her, “Grandma, how was the sermon today?’ She replied, “It would have been a very good sermon but Preacher Johnson missed three good places to stop.”

A little over a year ago, on Facebook, I posted a motivational, cancer-related quote each day for the month of October in honor of Cancer Awareness Month. So many people asked me to continue that I promised to TRY to come up with an annotated quote article every day for a year. The articles became rather popular. I ended up with a mailing list of special people who requested the articles, and with a blog site which garnered over twelve thousand hits during the course of the year. Last December, my friend David Brown said, “I’m just wondering how long you can go without it becoming trite and worn.” I remembered that in my writing.

The payoff has been wonderful. I have gotten many nice comments. The best part of it, though, is that, every day, as I make my way out and about town, two or three people will smile, wave and say,

“Hey, John, Everything is going to be all right.”

I reached my goal and it is now time for a little break. I will not abandon the mailing group, the blog, or the Facebook following, I just need to ponder about my next direction. You can always go wander around in the blog site archives which you will find here:  https://johnschulzauthor.com/

Today’s wonderful illustration is a gift from my friend Carmen Butcher, Author, Professor of English, Shorter University. Thanks, Carmen, I treasure it.

So, carry on. I’ll be in touch
Share a smile wherever you go
Remember that only you can determine your attitude
That you are the only you in the world, and that,
Everything is going to be all right.

John P. Schulz—“Sweetie Drives on Chemo Days.”

Number 364–What I Have Learned…

Quotes and Notes #364, November 3

The nandina shows us survival, strength, and beauty.

The nandina shows us survival, strength, and beauty.

“You have power over your mind—not outside events. Realize this, and you will find strength.”—Marcus Aurelius, “Meditations”—

If I have found a message through the course of writing 364 of these articles, it is this.

  •           You have power over your mind.
  •           You can control your attitude.
  •           You can find your own happiness.
  •           You can be you—it matters not what others think.
  •           You have great value.

When I go to the grocery store these days and smile at a perfect stranger, they seem to be delighted and they always return the gesture.

The final thing I found—just lately—is the saying, “You are the only you in the world.” I guess I always knew that but didn’t recognize it.
Everything is going to be all right.

John P. Schulz—“Sweetie Drives on Chemo Days.”

Got a Problem?–Kiss It–read on…

Quotes and Notes #363, November 2

Complex simplicity

Complex simplicity

“I met a man who sold umbrellas; just five dollars to avoid all that rain. A simple remedy to a problem beyond our control is often called the things you cannot change; serenity.”—Emily Flim—

This brings to mind the “KISS” principle. The Kiss principle is one of the most wonderful problem solving concepts that I ever came across. What does KISS stand for? “Keep It Simple, Stupid.”

A lot of times, if we will sit back and examine the problems that concern us, we will find little corners, rough places, and dangerous edges. If we take the time to chip away at the edges of the problem, we can finally get to its essence. We can simplify the problem. Then we can take care of that problem and move on to the next one. Keep it Simple.

This principle works best with a smile
Remember that you are the only you in the world.
Everything is going to be all right.

John P. Schulz—“Sweetie Drives on Chemo Days.”

Let’s Go For A Walk…

Quotes and notes, #362 November 1

Walking into outside.

Walking into outside.

“I only went out for a walk and finally concluded to stay out till sundown, for going out, I found, was really going in.”—John Muir—

“Now shall I walk or shall I ride?
‘Ride,’ Pleasure said;
‘Walk,’ Joy replied.”
—W.H. Davies—

A walk through the woods, a walk through town, or a rambling through the pictures in your mind—walks and other roamings are good for working on attitudes. Attitudes are what keep you happy (or unhappy, if you so choose).

“The trail is the thing, not the end of the trail. Travel too fast and you miss all you are traveling for.”—Louis L’Amour—

Share a smile with others as you pass by
Remember that you are the only you in the world.
Everything is going to be all right.

John P. Schulz—“Sweetie Drives on Chemo Days.”

I’m Just Going Along For The Ride…

Quotes and notes #361, October 31

Follow the rails--photo by Bill Land

Follow the rails–photo by Bill Land

“The older I get, the surer I am that I’m not running the show.”—Leonard Cohen—

Thank you Mr. Cohen. I’m now finding more and more, how nice it is to get a ticket on life’s railway, find a window seat, and see where that baby goes.

There is a lot to be said for letting go of the things that we can’t control. There is a lot to be said for patiently seeing to the details that matter to us. And there is a lot to be said for realizing that, “Everything is going to be all right.”

Share a smile
Remember that you are the only you in the world

Follow the rails–photo by Bill Land

John Schulz

I Can Leap Tall Buildings…

Quotes and Notes #360, October 30

Look, Mom, I can fly over the ocean--Photo by Bill Land

Look, Mom, I can fly over the ocean

“Every writer is a frustrated actor who recites his lines in the hidden auditorium of his skull.”—Rod Serling—

The funny thing is that we are all writers—of one sort or another. We make up our own stories and pack our heads full of them, mixing these tales in with the story that we are living. I can fly over the ocean or leap from the top of one skyscraper to another—in my mind.

If I am able to perform such amazing feats with the story-maker in my head, then I can also write into the story that I am an amazing, happy person who can tiptoe gently through life, one step at the time.

I can share a smile with everyone I meet today
I can be the best me I’ve ever been
Everything is going to be all right.

John P. Schulz—“Sweetie Drives on Chemo Days.”

Is That How It Happened?

Quotes and Notes #359

Looking back

Looking back

“Remembrance of things past is not necessarily the remembrance of things as they were.”—Marcel Proust—

I remember one of my most cherished possessions when I was eight was a pocket knife. One time I had a dime. I wanted to go to the hobby shop and buy a piece of balsa wood to carve a boat. It would be a wonderful boat with a sail and a Viking emblem. But, then, the Saturday morning movie that week featured Roy Rogers and Lash Larue. The movie cost a dime and I would get a free popsicle as I left the theater.

That is my first remembrance of financial conflict. It is also my first remembrance of problem solving. I found that a large piece of pine bark from a dead stump would make a satisfactory boat and I would still have my dime for the movie. That was sixty-two years ago—I wonder if it really happened?

I wanted to share that smile with you today
And to remind you that you are the only you in the world
Everything is going to be all right.

John P. Schulz—“Sweetie Drives on Chemo Days.”

Will You Find Magic Today?

Quotes and Notes #358, October 28

waiting for breakfast photo by Bill Land

Waiting for breakfast…photo by Bill Land

“I have always been delighted at the prospect of a new day, a fresh try, one more start, with perhaps a bit of magic waiting somewhere behind the morning.”—J.B. Priestley—

A new day awaits us every morning. A new day for adventure, for problem solving, for love and caring and sharing.

And magic? There may be some magic in the day. We may have to look for it. Searching under the corner of life’s carpet will sometimes reveal a bit of magic that has been swept into a hiding place. Or, the magic may be disguised and standing right in front of us waiting to be recognized. When you notice it, give it a big hug. Have a wonderful day.

Share a smile with someone who needs it
Remember that you are the only you in the world,
And, Everything is going to be all right.

John P. Schulz—“Sweetie Drives on Chemo Days.”

Can You Change Your Story?

Quotes and Notes #357, October 27

Who will red line the story of your life?

Who will red line the story of your life?

“I wanted to change the world. But I have found that the only thing one can be sure of changing is oneself.”—Aldous Huxley—

I write a story and give it to the editor. The story comes from my research, my experience, and my imagination—I can give it life, I can paint pictures in it, I can give it cadence or flow so that it sound almost like a song when read out loud. And then the editor goes over it and makes changes. Changes are discussed and corrections are made. The story gets better.

This doesn’t happen in my life, though. I cannot go back and make changes. I cannot be sure of the future story and I can only make changes in it before they happen. All I have for editing my life’s story is now. I get one shot at it and there are no red pencils that will mark the mistakes. I can develop a better plot for the future, but things may change, and what I expected may not be.

All I can really change is how I feel about things, and how I view my past, present, and perceived future. I can control my attitude.

I can share many smiles
I can know that I am the only me in the world
And I can accept that “Everything is going to be all right.”

John P. Schulz—“Sweetie Drives on Chemo Days.”

And It’s All So Easy!…

Quotes and Notes # 355, October 26

The bee's job is very simple--and most important.--photo by Bill Land

The bee’s job is very simple–and most important. Photo by Bill Land

“Despite all our amazing ability, ingenuity, technology and industry humans are the one species who have not mastered the art of simplicity.”—Rasheed Ogunlaru—

The bee performs a simple job—walk across the stamens to get pollen on its feet, walk across the pistils to seal everything up with nectar—and go home. The end result of the bee’s job, however, is more complicated. The bee pollinates the flowers, producing seeds, fruits, and sustenance for life on our world. Einstein said that without the bee, mankind would only survive for two years. And the bee’s job is so simple!

Closer to home, and in our minds, we may wish to explore ways in which we may simplify our lives. What concerns can we eliminate? What tasks can we make easier? Do we need help or can we give help? There are a lot of questions involved in the search for simplicity, but every little bit helps. Practice simplicity as you practice optimism. They are somehow related.

The simplest thing you can do for happiness is to share a smile
Recognize that You are the only you in the world
And, Everything is going to be all right.

John P. Schulz—“Sweetie Drives on Chemo Days.”

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